On July 27, 1995, the presidents of the United States and the Republic of Korea dedicated the Korean War Veterans Memorial on the 42nd anniversary of the war’s end. The memorial consists of an open triangle filled with 19 stainless-steel figures representing the 4 US military branches who look as if they are on patrol. A shallow reflecting pool fills the circle. Surrounding the soldiers is a wall filled with etchings made from war-related photographs. Another wall lists 22 members of the United Nations that contributed troops or medical support to the Korean war effort.

Learn more at Histories of the National Mall.

On July 27, 1995, the presidents of the United States and the Republic of Korea dedicated the Korean War Veterans Memorial on the 42nd anniversary of the war’s end. The memorial consists of an open triangle filled with 19 stainless-steel figures representing the 4 US military branches who look as if they are on patrol. A shallow reflecting pool fills the circle. Surrounding the soldiers is a wall filled with etchings made from war-related photographs. Another wall lists 22 members of the United Nations that contributed troops or medical support to the Korean war effort.

Learn more at Histories of the National Mall.


Originally created for the 1876 Philadelphia Exposition, sculptor Frederic Bartholdi had hoped to sell the fountain after the exposition concluded. The only offer to purchase it was made by Congress, who bought the work for $6,000. The sculpture was moved from Philadelphia to Washington and placed at the site of the original botanical garden, which stood where the Capitol Reflecting Pool is today. In 1927 the sculpture was moved to its present home in the newly-established Bartholdi Park.

Learn more at Histories of the National Mall.

Originally created for the 1876 Philadelphia Exposition, sculptor Frederic Bartholdi had hoped to sell the fountain after the exposition concluded. The only offer to purchase it was made by Congress, who bought the work for $6,000. The sculpture was moved from Philadelphia to Washington and placed at the site of the original botanical garden, which stood where the Capitol Reflecting Pool is today. In 1927 the sculpture was moved to its present home in the newly-established Bartholdi Park.

Learn more at Histories of the National Mall.


This postcard from 1913 shows the Mall and Pennsylvania Avenue. The building in the left foreground is the old Botanic Garden conservatory, with the Bartholdi Fountain between it and Pennsylvania Avenue. Business and residential buildings are still standing between 3rd and 4th Streets where the National Gallery of Art is today. Beyond them is the dome of the National Museum of Natural History and the Washington Monument. 

Learn more at Histories of the National Mall.

This postcard from 1913 shows the Mall and Pennsylvania Avenue. The building in the left foreground is the old Botanic Garden conservatory, with the Bartholdi Fountain between it and Pennsylvania Avenue. Business and residential buildings are still standing between 3rd and 4th Streets where the National Gallery of Art is today. Beyond them is the dome of the National Museum of Natural History and the Washington Monument. 

Learn more at Histories of the National Mall.


Olmsted Jr. was a landscape architect appointed by President Theodore Roosevelt to serve on the Senate Park Commission in 1901. The Commission was charged with improving the Mall’s design and restoring elements of Pierre Charles L’Enfant’s original plan. Olmsted Jr. established himself after apprenticing with his father, Frederick Law Olmsted, the landscape architect famous for building New York’s Central Park. While working for the Commission, Olmsted Jr. was responsible for designing the landscape and parks system for the Mall. Throughout his life, he remained committed to national and civic parks across the US.

Learn more at Histories of the National Mall.

Olmsted Jr. was a landscape architect appointed by President Theodore Roosevelt to serve on the Senate Park Commission in 1901. The Commission was charged with improving the Mall’s design and restoring elements of Pierre Charles L’Enfant’s original plan. Olmsted Jr. established himself after apprenticing with his father, Frederick Law Olmsted, the landscape architect famous for building New York’s Central Park. While working for the Commission, Olmsted Jr. was responsible for designing the landscape and parks system for the Mall. Throughout his life, he remained committed to national and civic parks across the US.

Learn more at Histories of the National Mall.


In July 1790, when Congress approved the establishment of a federal capital on the Potomac River, the area they chose was already owned by people who lived and farmed there. President George Washington and other government officials negotiated with these proprietors to convince them to sell or donate the land to the United States. In March 1791 fifteen proprietors signed an agreement that sold half of their property to the government, while they kept the rights to the other half, which allowed the city to develop while residents kept their homes. Formal deeds of transfer were registered in December 1791.

Learn more at Histories of the National Mall.

In July 1790, when Congress approved the establishment of a federal capital on the Potomac River, the area they chose was already owned by people who lived and farmed there. President George Washington and other government officials negotiated with these proprietors to convince them to sell or donate the land to the United States. In March 1791 fifteen proprietors signed an agreement that sold half of their property to the government, while they kept the rights to the other half, which allowed the city to develop while residents kept their homes. Formal deeds of transfer were registered in December 1791.

Learn more at Histories of the National Mall.


Built between 1832 and 1833, the Lockkeeper’s House was the home of the toll keeper who collected tolls from those traveling along the Chesapeake & Ohio Canal Extension. Some accounts report that a resident lockkeeper and his family of 13 children shared the living quarters. The Extension, connecting the C&O Canal to the Washington City Canal, was filled in during the 1870s, as rail shipping eventually replaced canal shipping. The National Park Service acquired the house in the early 1900s, and since then it has been used as an administration building and for storage.

Learn more at Histories of the National Mall.

Built between 1832 and 1833, the Lockkeeper’s House was the home of the toll keeper who collected tolls from those traveling along the Chesapeake & Ohio Canal Extension. Some accounts report that a resident lockkeeper and his family of 13 children shared the living quarters. The Extension, connecting the C&O Canal to the Washington City Canal, was filled in during the 1870s, as rail shipping eventually replaced canal shipping. The National Park Service acquired the house in the early 1900s, and since then it has been used as an administration building and for storage.

Learn more at Histories of the National Mall.


The summer outdoor film festival “Screen on the Green” on the National Mall began in 1999. Held at sundown throughout July and August, this free event is one of the most popular social and recreational events held on the Mall among locals and visitors alike. The films shown that first summer were Casablanca, The Wizard of Oz, Citizen Kane, King Kong, and Rebel without a Cause.

Learn more at Histories of the National Mall.

The summer outdoor film festival “Screen on the Green” on the National Mall began in 1999. Held at sundown throughout July and August, this free event is one of the most popular social and recreational events held on the Mall among locals and visitors alike. The films shown that first summer were Casablanca, The Wizard of Oz, Citizen Kane, King Kong, and Rebel without a Cause.

Learn more at Histories of the National Mall.


Mary Ann Hall’s brothel was the largest and most luxurious of more than 100 known bordellos in Washington during the 1800s. Hall’s three-story establishment stood where the National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) is today. According to Union Army records, she employed 18 women. Archaeological excavations indicate that Hall imported French wine and champagne for her clients. She ran her establishment until 1883, dying in 1886 with a net worth of $87,000. Although Washington police frequently harassed and arrested prostitutes, the profession remained legal in DC until 1914.

Learn more at Histories of the National Mall.

Mary Ann Hall’s brothel was the largest and most luxurious of more than 100 known bordellos in Washington during the 1800s. Hall’s three-story establishment stood where the National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) is today. According to Union Army records, she employed 18 women. Archaeological excavations indicate that Hall imported French wine and champagne for her clients. She ran her establishment until 1883, dying in 1886 with a net worth of $87,000. Although Washington police frequently harassed and arrested prostitutes, the profession remained legal in DC until 1914.

Learn more at Histories of the National Mall.


Located within President’s Park on the National Mall, the Second Division Memorial is dedicated to those members of the Second Infantry Division of the US army who have died while in service. Originally dedicated in 1936 by President Franklin Roosevelt, the memorial honored service in World War I. The flaming sword at the memorial’s center represents the defense of Paris from German forces during that conflict. In 1962, two wings were added to the memorial to represent service in World War II and the Korean War.

Learn more at Histories of the National Mall.

Located within President’s Park on the National Mall, the Second Division Memorial is dedicated to those members of the Second Infantry Division of the US army who have died while in service. Originally dedicated in 1936 by President Franklin Roosevelt, the memorial honored service in World War I. The flaming sword at the memorial’s center represents the defense of Paris from German forces during that conflict. In 1962, two wings were added to the memorial to represent service in World War II and the Korean War.

Learn more at Histories of the National Mall.