Some baseball clubs in the 1860s exchanged ribbons printed with their team names just before a game. Some players collected the ribbons on their uniforms, displaying all the teams they had faced. These ribbons are from the Washington Nationals and the Philadelphia Athletics. The Nationals’ home field was the Ellipse, just south of the White House. In 1865, the Nationals faced the Athletics in a tournament which drew hundreds of spectators, including President Andrew Johnson. These ribbons may not be from that game, but they are from the collection of an early fan of Washington baseball.

Learn more at Histories of the National Mall.

Some baseball clubs in the 1860s exchanged ribbons printed with their team names just before a game. Some players collected the ribbons on their uniforms, displaying all the teams they had faced. These ribbons are from the Washington Nationals and the Philadelphia Athletics. The Nationals’ home field was the Ellipse, just south of the White House. In 1865, the Nationals faced the Athletics in a tournament which drew hundreds of spectators, including President Andrew Johnson. These ribbons may not be from that game, but they are from the collection of an early fan of Washington baseball.

Learn more at Histories of the National Mall.


Rustin was a crucial force for Civil Rights activism, much of which was related to protests on the National Mall. The first March on Washington movement emerged in 1941 when black activists, including Rustin, successfully pressured President Franklin D. Roosevelt to end racial discrimination in federal employment. Their advocacy was so effective that the mere threat of a march spurred action and the march itself was called off. Then, in 1963, Rustin was a pivotal organizer for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Though Rustin remained a behind the scenes organizer at the event itself, he was featured on the cover of LIFE Magazine along with A. Philip Randolph as the two main organizers of the march.

Learn more at Histories of the National Mall.

Rustin was a crucial force for Civil Rights activism, much of which was related to protests on the National Mall. The first March on Washington movement emerged in 1941 when black activists, including Rustin, successfully pressured President Franklin D. Roosevelt to end racial discrimination in federal employment. Their advocacy was so effective that the mere threat of a march spurred action and the march itself was called off. Then, in 1963, Rustin was a pivotal organizer for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Though Rustin remained a behind the scenes organizer at the event itself, he was featured on the cover of LIFE Magazine along with A. Philip Randolph as the two main organizers of the march.

Learn more at Histories of the National Mall.


The McMillan Plan was presented to Congress and the public by its authors, the Senate Park Commission, in 1902. It described a comprehensive plan redesigning not only the National Mall but the entire system of parks in Washington, DC. Their proposed redesign of the Mall included removing the train station from near 6th street and unifying the landscape between the Capitol and the Washington Monument.

The McMillan Plan was presented to Congress and the public by its authors, the Senate Park Commission, in 1902. It described a comprehensive plan redesigning not only the National Mall but the entire system of parks in Washington, DC. Their proposed redesign of the Mall included removing the train station from near 6th street and unifying the landscape between the Capitol and the Washington Monument.


Between 1835 and 1855, a lockkeeper lived in a small stone cottage on the juncture of the Washington City Canal and the C & O Extension. Decaying conditions of the canal, lack of sanitation, arguments between federal and local governments and contractors and workers prevented its development and led to its deterioration. When the lockkeeper’s tenure ended in 1855, the house was abandoned. Squatters took over the house for a few years. In this picture, a resident sits by the front door, laundry drying on a clothesline nearby. Later, the house became a holding pen for prisoners, then a storage facility for the National Park Service.

Learn more at Histories of the National Mall.

Between 1835 and 1855, a lockkeeper lived in a small stone cottage on the juncture of the Washington City Canal and the C & O Extension. Decaying conditions of the canal, lack of sanitation, arguments between federal and local governments and contractors and workers prevented its development and led to its deterioration. When the lockkeeper’s tenure ended in 1855, the house was abandoned. Squatters took over the house for a few years. In this picture, a resident sits by the front door, laundry drying on a clothesline nearby. Later, the house became a holding pen for prisoners, then a storage facility for the National Park Service.

Learn more at Histories of the National Mall.

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todaysdocument:

Doors of Monumental Proportions

The massive bronze doors of the National Archives first opened on October 18, 1935 (which also happens to fall in the middle of American Archives Month!).

If you have ever visited the National Archives in Washington, DC, you may have noticed two very, very large bronze doors that mark the original Constitution Avenue entrance to the building. Visitors enter through the Constitution Avenue entrance to view the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Bill of Rights as well as the many other exhibits the National Archives Museum offers.

These bronze doors stand about 37 feet, 7 inches high and are 10 feet wide and 11 inches thick. Each weighs roughly 6.5 tons. The building’s architect, John Russell Pope, understanding the national significance of the structure, sought to design a public exhibition hall of monumental proportions. As a reminder to visitors of the importance of the building’s purpose, the public exhibition hall Pope designed—the rotunda—measures 75 feet high; the bronze doors leading into the exhibition hall match that in size and character.

The doors were first opened on October 18, 1935. Then visitors to the National Archives climbed up 39 steps on Constitution Avenue and walked past two rows of giant Corinthian columns before passing through the large, motorized doors. Each morning, guards opened the doors by turning a key to slide them open. In the evening, the guards would close them for the night. Just past the bronze doors are another, smaller set of doors that kept out the elements.

For 65 years, visitors walked through these stunning doors to visit National Archives exhibits. When the Archives reopened in 2003 following a two-year renovation, the bronze doors remained closed. Visitors now enter on the sidewalk level of Constitution Avenue. While the bronze doors are now opened only on special occasions, they remain a notable feature of the building and continue to remind visitors of the significance of the National Archives and its work.

via Prologue: Pieces of History » Doors of Monumental Proportions


In November 1938 a group of white women led by Eleanor Patterson, owner of the Washington Times-Herald, protested the removal of cherry trees from the Tidal Basin to make way for the Jefferson Memorial. On November 18, the women chained themselves to trees at the Memorial worksite and stole workmen’s shovels. Their tactics delayed cherry tree removal until officials convinced the women that after the removal of cherry trees to make way for the Memorial, more would be planted elsewhere along the Tidal Basin.

Learn more at Histories of the National Mall.

In November 1938 a group of white women led by Eleanor Patterson, owner of the Washington Times-Herald, protested the removal of cherry trees from the Tidal Basin to make way for the Jefferson Memorial. On November 18, the women chained themselves to trees at the Memorial worksite and stole workmen’s shovels. Their tactics delayed cherry tree removal until officials convinced the women that after the removal of cherry trees to make way for the Memorial, more would be planted elsewhere along the Tidal Basin.

Learn more at Histories of the National Mall.


This march on the National Mall for African American civil rights was proposed by Louis Farrakhan and organized with the support of the National African American Leadership Summit, the Nation of Islam, and various civil rights organizations. The March organizers wanted to challenge what they perceived as growing racism in the United States, particularly in government policy, and to present a new definition of black manhood to the nation. The main focus of the event was sessions held on a stage near the west front of the Capitol. Estimates for attendance vary, ranging from 400,000 to 870,000 people.

Learn more at Histories of the National Mall.

This march on the National Mall for African American civil rights was proposed by Louis Farrakhan and organized with the support of the National African American Leadership Summit, the Nation of Islam, and various civil rights organizations. The March organizers wanted to challenge what they perceived as growing racism in the United States, particularly in government policy, and to present a new definition of black manhood to the nation. The main focus of the event was sessions held on a stage near the west front of the Capitol. Estimates for attendance vary, ranging from 400,000 to 870,000 people.

Learn more at Histories of the National Mall.


The brick Baltimore and Ohio Railway Depot stood at the intersection of Pennsylvania Avenue and Second Street on lots formerly occupied by a cabinet maker and a boarding house. Fitted with offices, living rooms, and a waiting room, an agent and a staff of fewer than half a dozen men managed passenger, baggage and freight. A few thousand people flocked to the station to greet the first trains arriving in 1835, welcomed at the District line by the mayor and the Marine Band. The first passengers were escorted to nearby taverns and hotels for entertainment. Most then, returned to Baltimore, where their journey originated.

Learn More at Histories of the National Mall.

The brick Baltimore and Ohio Railway Depot stood at the intersection of Pennsylvania Avenue and Second Street on lots formerly occupied by a cabinet maker and a boarding house. Fitted with offices, living rooms, and a waiting room, an agent and a staff of fewer than half a dozen men managed passenger, baggage and freight. A few thousand people flocked to the station to greet the first trains arriving in 1835, welcomed at the District line by the mayor and the Marine Band. The first passengers were escorted to nearby taverns and hotels for entertainment. Most then, returned to Baltimore, where their journey originated.

Learn More at Histories of the National Mall.


The National March on Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights, held on October 14, 1979, was inspired in part by the assassination of openly gay California politician Harvey Milk. The five issues the march supported included the end of anti-homosexual laws and a push for a ban on discrimination in the federal government based on sexual orientation. Thousands of people attended, and the event nationalized the movement for gay rights, which was previously fragmented and focused on problems in individual communities.

Learn more at Histories of the National Mall.

The National March on Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights, held on October 14, 1979, was inspired in part by the assassination of openly gay California politician Harvey Milk. The five issues the march supported included the end of anti-homosexual laws and a push for a ban on discrimination in the federal government based on sexual orientation. Thousands of people attended, and the event nationalized the movement for gay rights, which was previously fragmented and focused on problems in individual communities.

Learn more at Histories of the National Mall.